Friday, February 3, 2012

A League of Their Own

"She's done."
A League of Their Own, 1992. Directed by Penny Marshall. Starring: Geena Davis, Tom Hanks, Lori Petty.


"Two sisters join the first female professional baseball league and struggle to help it succeed amidst their own growing rivalry." (IMDB). 

I like old school Tom Hanks, and this is one of my favorites. The shot of him peeing alone makes this film worth watching. Without coming off sounding too dismissive or ill-supportive of women filmmakers (and women in general) I have to say that this film would have been nothing without Hanks; he steals every scene and saves the film from being mostly cheesy and . . . chick-flicky. The music was a little weak, and some of the dialogues between the women were not that great, but luckily there are a collection of scenes toward the end (not involving Hanks at all) that are interesting, well-done, and show the powerful love/hate relationship between the two sisters, Dottie (Geena Davis) and Kit (Lori Petty).

The first is when Dottie, the star player, is at bat and Kit must pitch to her, knowing everything she knows about how good Dottie is and everything that's happened between them. The shot of Dottie walking to the plate is *amazing* and so incredibly bad ass I wish almost wish I hadn't sent the disk back right away because I want to watch it again. The second is a little more emotional, when it's Kit's turn to hit, Dottie will be catching right behind her, and she's sobbing uncontrollably, unable to bring herself out of the dugout to face her. It's pretty major.

Marla Hooch is good, belting those balls out and shattering windows ("Okay, honey, now the left," her old man says, as all the boys fielding her hits back up and groan loudly) and John Lovitz was nice as the arrogant scout. Call me crazy but I thought Madonna was a total distraction in this, and that her banter with Rosie O'Donnell was forced, not funny, and went on too long. Keep in the bit about the bosoms flying out, though. That was clever.

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